Home / Credit¢ents Blog

Creditcents: Credit and Personal Finance Blog from Creditnet.com

The Top 10 Wealthiest Athletes

As the smoke from the NFL lockout begins to clear, we can finally rest assured that the coming sports year will be full of labor peace and exciting games. Oh wait, it turns out that just as one pro sports lockout gets resolved, another one (and by all accounts a much lengthier one) is just getting started in the NBA. Yes indeed, all we can look forward to this year in the pro basketball world is exciting shots of lawyers in pressed suits walking into conference rooms, with nary a slam dunk in sight. And with all this bickering from both sides, it’s time to have a nice little reality check just to remind us how lucrative the sports industry really is. While the average American spends their time finding ways to reduce credit card debt with 0% interest credit cards, athletes and owners are complaining over how to divvy up their billion dollar industries. So which athletes should never have to worry about missing any paychecks? Here's a list of the top ten wealthiest athletes in America.

Ask Creditnet: Carry a Balance or Pay in Full?

MasterCard credit card Dear Creditnet: I have finally received my first credit card for bad credit after bankruptcy. My question is do I charge $400 to the card and make minimum payments over time to establish a track record, or do I charge $40 to $50 monthly and pay off the entire balance?

US Mint Closes Airline Rewards Card Loophole

The U.S. Mint has closed a loophole that allowed owners of credit cards with airline miles to rack up free fares— without spending any money. Credit card users across the country are smacking their heads and asking themselves why they didn’t think of that earlier. In an effort to spread $1 coins into circulation, the U.S. Mint had been offering what it thought was a zero-sum deal to consumers: the ability for citizens to purchase large quantities of $1 coins at face value.  In other words, you charge $5,000 on your credit card, and a few days later $5,000-worth of $1 coins would arrive on your doorstep.

Ask Creditnet: Do Lenders Use the Same FICO scores?

Dear Creditnet: Are the FICO credit scores I can buy at myFICO.com just an estimate of the scores actual lenders use? I'm getting ready to apply for a mortgage and want to make sure there are no surprises when potential lenders pull my credit.

Debt Ceiling and Credit Cards: Why You Shouldn't Care

congress

Congress has pushed through a last-minute bill that will arrive on President Obama's desk this afternoon. In addition, the White House has already stated that even though this bill is imperfect, the President will immediately sign it to ensure the debt ceiling is raised and our government is able to continue paying its bills.

Hurray, the debt ceiling crisis has been averted. Way to go guys and gals! You beat the deadline by a few hours…it's a miracle.

No Annual Fee Credit Cards: Are They Right For You?

As credit card lenders battle to regain the top spot in our wallets, we're seeing an onslaught of awesome credit card deals offering incentives like huge signup bonuses and newly revamped rewards programs.  However, there is one credit card perk that, at least for me, stands out from the rest—the almighty no annual fee.

No Annual Fee Credit Cards

The importance of no annual fee credit cards is fairly straight forward. While other credit card rewards can be complex and confusing, freeing yourself from a big annual fee benefits everyone in the same two ways:

Top 9 Twitter Follows for Personal Finance

Where would we be without Twitter? It's amazing that Twitter is only five years old. The ability to get quick information that's specifically relevant to you has revolutionized the way the world communicates. Nowadays, the world announces news, sports scores, celebrity gossip, and every other conceivable bits of information on Twitter timelines. It's not all fun, though. The one drawback of Twitter is the oversaturation of useless accounts. Finding a good account to follow can sometimes feel like picking a needle out of the world's largest haystack. Nevertheless, Twitter is an excellent source for insight on personal finance. From tips on the best no annual fee credit cards to advice on investments and saving, the Twittersphere is ripe with fruitful money knowledge. You just need to know who to follow! Here are the top 9 tweeters out there on the subject of personal finance:

What is the Future of Credit?

 

Who doesn't love the Jetsons? They had just about every far-flung technological idea imaginable, including hovercrafts, personal robot slaves and cities in the sky...but they didn't have 0% interest credit cards. Even the Jetsons were still using cash in 2062! We may not have reached the Jetson's level of space-age sophistication quite yet, but we've certainly got them beat in the payments department. So what kind of technological advancements will the next 50 years bring us in credit, credit cards, and credit scoring techniques?

Who Invented the Credit Card?

[caption id="attachment_4493" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption=" "]Amex Blue credit cardPhoto by TaxBrackets.org[/caption]

Credit cards certainly aren't a new phenomenon. In fact, credit cards are nothing more than a physical representation of an old accounting technique that simply puts things “on account” –accounts payable if you owed someone and accounts receivable if you were expecting payment from a customer. Generally, such transactions were limited between businesses, and much of the system was based primarily on the integrity of the company doing the borrowing.

However, consumer credit using cards officially began in the 1920s when select oil companies and hotels would give pre-approved customers the ability to put their charges on account. Such “cards” were limited to transactions occurring only between select customers and the firm from which they were purchasing. Several years later in 1938, companies began to accept cards from other retail merchants too.

Micocredit: More Good Than Harm?

I was recently in Bangladesh working with a local nonprofit organization that specializes in microcredit programs.  To demonstrate the success of their lending, they took me to meet a woman named Baby Chakma who lived in the remote southeastern hill country.

Baby had won an award from Citibank for her use of microcredit loans to successfully turn her home into a thriving farm and business.  When I visited, her small thatch hut (shown below) consisted of a storefront facing the dirt road, a room for growing mushrooms, and various small vegetable fields and cows surrounded the structure.

Pages

Home / Credit¢ents Blog