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Four Things To Do When You Lose Your Wallet

It’s probably happened to you before; panic sets in as you start rifling through bags and drawers. While your hands go a mile a minute, so does your mind as you try to retrace your steps and remember exactly where you could have left it. That’s right, your wallet is gone.

Is a Perfect Credit Score Worth It?

Consumers across the nation have the terms “FICO” and “credit score” embedded into their brains. These terms refer to a scoring system that judges a person’s reliability with creditors. Creditors use this main scoring system as their gospel for making crucial credit decisions. While they may use other factors in their decision-making process, creditors weigh an applicant’s score the highest in their procedures. Consumers are under the impression that they must all set their heights to achieving a perfect credit score. Is a perfect credit score worth it? 

Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite MasterCard® Increases Bonus to 50,000 Points

Barclaycard is clearly making a real push to drive new cardholders to its  Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite MasterCard® instead of the no-annual fee version of the card.  The main change I wanted to quickly write about today is that new cardholders can now earn 50,000 points, worth $500 in travel credit, after spending $3,000 during the first 90 days.

Barclaycard Arrival MasterCard Review: To Pay - Or Not To Pay - The Annual Fee

The myth regarding annual fees attached to credit cards is that they're ALL BAD. This is simply that - a myth - and frankly some annual fees are easily wiped out by the cash back and rewards benefits afforded by a particular card.

The NASCAR Visa Credit Card Review

Are you a NASCAR superfan? If not, you can stop reading this review right now. There are most likely better rewards credit cards out there to meet your personal financial needs.

FICO vs FAKO: Are You Getting the Right Credit Score?

Anyone who has ever applied for a loan, regardless of the type, has probably been told that the lending institution will have to “run their credit.” The latter is a phrase that refers to obtaining the applicant's credit score in order to determine whether or not the individual is a good credit risk. This is often referred to as the person's FICO–Fair Isaac Company–score. This score is what virtually all lenders use to determine how likely it is that a specific borrower will default on a loan or other financial obligation, as well as whether or not the person will make timely payments on loans or other lines of credit.

Ask Creditnet: Can I Rebuild Credit with Prepaid Debit Cards?

Dear Creditnet: I need to start rebuilding my credit so I can purchase a home, but I can't seem to get approved for a credit card. I've applied for 3 different cards this year and I've been denied every time. I feel like giving up. Should I just get a prepaid debit card since they don't do credit checks? There's no way I can get denied, right?

Ask Creditnet: Will My Credit Card Get Closed?

Dear Creditnet: My husband and I have one credit card each and the balances total about $1,200. Due to financial difficulties we have not been able to make any payments on these credit cards for almost a year. At one time we were getting letters from a collection agency, but we are now getting letters to pay our balance from the original creditor.

FICO Score 9: Paid vs Unpaid Collections

90 percent of lenders still use FICO scores in some way when assessing your risk as a borrower. So if you have any interest in ever getting approved for a high limit credit card, auto loan, or a mortgage, it's a wise financial move to know where your FICO scores stand and what you can do to improve them.

Ask Creditnet: How Many Credit Cards Should I Have?

Colorful credit cards Dear Creditnet: What is a good number of credit cards to have in order to optimize my FICO credit scores? Is it possible to have too few or too many credit cards? - Jenny from UT


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