airline rewards credit card

airline rewards credit card

Southwest Rapid Rewards Card Review: 25,000 Point Bonus

If you're interested in the Southwest Rapid Rewards Plus Card, but missed out on the big 50,000 point sign-up bonus that quickly came and went last year, Southwest hasn't left you completely hanging.  There's still a 25,000 point bonus to be had after making your first purchase on the card. This is actually the same deal Southwest and Chase were offering new cardholders back in August of 2011, so it's nothing we haven't seen before.  And as I said when I've previously reviewed this card offer, it certainly isn't a bad deal for a $69 annual fee, but it's not superb either. In addition, based on what we've seen in the past, I think it's fairly safe to say that we'll continue to see sign-up bonuses for the Rapid Rewards Card bounce back and forth between 25,000 and 50,000 points in the coming year. We may even see it bounce back up to 50,000 before the end of 2012, but that's just a guess on my part.

Book 4 Tickets to Hawaii for $20 with British Airways Visa Signature Card 100,000 Bonus

The British Airways Visa Signature Card is back again with another 100,000 mile promotion. While it's not quite as good as last year's deal, which offered 100,000 bonus points after simply making one purchase and spending $2,500 during the first three months, the latest promotion still provides new cardholders with the opportunity to earn up to 100,000 bonus Avios points during the first year. The main difference between the two deals is that you'll have to spend a lot more this time around to bank all the sign-up bonus points, which means you may even need to make the British Airways Card your go-to credit card for most of the year. Here's a quick breakdown of what you'll need to do to earn the full 100,000 point bonus:

Citi® Platinum Select®/AAdvantage® Visa Signature® Card: 30,000 Sign-up Bonus

Update: This offer is no longer available. This card is now titled the Citi® Platinum Select® / AAdvantage® World MasterCard® - find the most up-to-date offer available on Creditnet today!

If you already fly American a lot or are simply on the hunt for another lucrative sign-up bonus to take advantage of this year, here's why you should check out Citi's new offer: Top 5 Things We Like About the New Citi AAdvantage Card

Americans Are Spending Smarter

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While economists tend to focus their attention on the latest stock market trends and fiscal policy, there are new consumer trends developing that hit much closer to home.  For example, the decisions Americans have been making about how often they reach for their credit cards has changed dramatically over the past few years. Indeed, consumers have adopted new spending habits that speak volumes about the lasting impact of the economic recession.

Here’s a quick glance at an interesting trend we've noticed and what it might say about the rest of the economy as a whole.

Southwest Rapid Rewards Plus Card: 50,000 Bonus is Back!

I reviewed the latest version of the Southwest Rapid Rewards Plus credit card just over a month ago.  If you missed it, my main point in that review was if you could manage to wait for a better offer to come along from Southwest later this year, then you should. Well, I love it when I'm right!

Review of Southwest's Rapid Rewards Plus Credit Card

Chase pulled the plug last month on its popular 50,000 bonus point Southwest Premier card offer. However, As of Monday August 8th 2011, its replacement hit the market—the 25,000 point Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards Plus credit card. This is a pretty standard offer from Southwest, so I wouldn't say it's anything to get too excited about. If you don't need the card right away so you can redeem the 25,000 points, you may want to try waiting for a better promotion to hit the market in the coming months. It could very well happen towards the end of the year or in early 2012.

How to Rack Up Airline Miles

It seems as though airlines are doing every little thing they can lately to tack on fees (American Airlines, for example, now charges $8 for a blanket and neck pillow) while simultaneously curtailing service (removing a number of lavatories to make room for more seating). Somewhat paradoxically however, airlines also love to offer incentives for flying with them. The most common among these incentives are of course frequent flier programs, in which points accumulated through travel and other purchases can be applied as airfare discounts and upgrades. Unfortunately, there's not much we can do about $8 blankets or the lack of sufficient lavatories. What we can do as savvy travelers is find the best ways to take advantage of the incentives airlines actually still provide. Here are some tips on how to rack up airline frequent flyer miles as fast as possible:

Citi ThankYou Premier Card Review: What's Changed?

(Update: This offer is no longer available. Check out the current listings of available Citibank credit cards on Creditnet.com.)

I've been reviewing (and personally using) the Citi ThankYou Premier Card since 2008 when it was originally called the Citi PremierPass Elite Card.  I loved it back then, and I still "like" it a lot today. While there's no doubt Citi has watered down this card offer quite a bit over the years, the fact is it continues to rank among the top tier of travel rewards credit cards. Feel free to read my previous review for all the details about why the "Citi ThankYou Premier Card Still Makes Me Smile".

How to Book a Free Airline Rewards Ticket Without Getting Ripped Off

When a new customer chooses from the endless array of credit cards with airline miles rewards, there are many important factors that come into play. Annual fees, introductory rates, and the rate of mileage accrual must all be taken into careful consideration before choosing a card. But one aspect that often gets overlooked is perhaps also the most important: just how ‘rewarding’ are these airline rewards programs really?

US Mint Closes Airline Rewards Card Loophole

The U.S. Mint has closed a loophole that allowed owners of credit cards with airline miles to rack up free fares— without spending any money. Credit card users across the country are smacking their heads and asking themselves why they didn’t think of that earlier. In an effort to spread $1 coins into circulation, the U.S. Mint had been offering what it thought was a zero-sum deal to consumers: the ability for citizens to purchase large quantities of $1 coins at face value.  In other words, you charge $5,000 on your credit card, and a few days later $5,000-worth of $1 coins would arrive on your doorstep.

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