Logan Abbott

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Logan Abbott

Logan Abbott is a personal finance and credit card expert with over 5 years of experience writing about each topic. He is a graduate of the USC Marshall School of Business, and also contributes to other online finance publications. He has been quoted in the New York Times, San Diego Union Tribune, TheStreet, and more.

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Recent Blogs

Top 9 Twitter Follows for Personal Finance

Where would we be without Twitter? It's amazing that Twitter is only five years old. The ability to get quick information that's specifically relevant to you has revolutionized the way the world communicates. Nowadays, the world announces news, sports scores, celebrity gossip, and every other conceivable bits of information on Twitter timelines. It's not all fun, though. The one drawback of Twitter is the oversaturation of useless accounts. Finding a good account to follow can sometimes feel like picking a needle out of the world's largest haystack. Nevertheless, Twitter is an excellent source for insight on personal finance. From tips on the best no annual fee credit cards to advice on investments and saving, the Twittersphere is ripe with fruitful money knowledge. You just need to know who to follow! Here are the top 9 tweeters out there on the subject of personal finance:

What is the Future of Credit?


Who doesn't love the Jetsons? They had just about every far-flung technological idea imaginable, including hovercrafts, personal robot slaves and cities in the sky...but they didn't have 0% interest credit cards. Even the Jetsons were still using cash in 2062! We may not have reached the Jetson's level of space-age sophistication quite yet, but we've certainly got them beat in the payments department. So what kind of technological advancements will the next 50 years bring us in credit, credit cards, and credit scoring techniques?

15 Wealthiest Members of Congress

There’s quite the debate going on in Washington DC regarding the nation’s debt and what spending to cut. Democrats are proposing to eliminate tax write-offs and make cuts to military spending, while Republicans are seeking to cut discretionary and entitlement spending. Whatever the final deal includes, the hope is that it will help foster an economic recovery. Most Americans aren’t in the best financial shape right now. We're working with debt, seeing our credit scores drop, having to turn to bad credit credit cards, and we are angry at Washington for not fixing the problem. That, of course, is easier said than done. Still, it’s hard to stomach talk from politicians in either party at times when you think about their finances. Are politicians hurting as much as your family? Probably not, given the average net worth for an elected official in Washington, D.C. is just under $1 Million. In an effort to get a better idea of how much some of these people are actually worth, we did some research and compiled a list of the 15 wealthiest politicians currently serving in Congress (via estimated net worth):

5 Steps to the Best Budget

If you haven’t been following the news recently, then you’ve been missing out on quite the political battle in Washington, DC over our nation’s debt. I’d go into more detail, but the specifics and grand-standing would probably give you a headache. To make a long story short: we need to cut spending and raise revenues, but neither party can agree on a way to move forward and the President is left shaking his head at party leaders behaving more like spoiled children rather than statesmen. Our national budget may be a mess, but yours doesn’t have to be. Creditnet has an easy, 5-step process to making sure your budget is sound so you don’t end up with a crippling debt like Washington.

Using Credit Cards to Fund Your Small Business

Credit cards can often be a double-edged sword. When used incorrectly, they can destroy the most seasoned financier. However, when used in wisdom, they can be a powerful wealth generating tool. Perhaps you own a small business and supplies need to be purchased today to ship to a customer, but you won't actually receive payment for a couple of weeks? While new businesses low on cash flow may find difficulty in funding short-term operational needs, interim cash flow shortages can often be remedied through the use of credit cards and other forms of revolving credit. In fact, using no interest credit cards can be a great way for entrepreneurs to fund small expenses while getting a business up-and-running. Access to quick cash is essential for nearly any business’ operations, and even after you've passed the zero interest grace period, the card can still be useful in the normal course of one’s business dealings.